My First Yogurt–Bleagh!

To get into the mood for writing about yogurt, I spent several days scarfing down at least one Stonyfield Farm Organic Whole Milk Yogurt every day. I like to add bee pollen–two superfoods in one delicious serving!

The bee pollen this time is locally produced at Thomas Honey in Lake City, Florida. I got it at the Florida Folk Festival last May when I appeared there as an unfeatured fiddler.

Some people might challenge the assertion that yogurt is a superfood. But, I have anecdotal evidence that you can get super results from eating it!

First, my bleagh! story.

I was in my early twenties when I first tried eating a yogurt. At that time, I wasn’t into health food, so I don’t know what I read or heard about yogurt that prompted me to give it a try.

What I recall vividly is the experience of spooning slowly through a Borden’s strawberry yogurt. As I took in the contents of the now familiar 6 oz cup, I thought, “Hmmm, a little sour like buttermilk, a pudding-like consistency…” The jury was out.

Then I got to the bottom of the container. There was a pinkish, gelatinous layer on the bottom. Yuck! The jury came in with a unanimous verdict of Disgusting.

And that was it for several years.

Moving ahead to 1969 and my arrival at the Sunshine Company commune in Detroit, this is what happened.

While taking a shower, I found out that my hair was electing to leave my head in great numbers. Panic! How could I be a hippie if my hair was falling out?

Somehow, my synchronistic discovery was that Bulgarians enjoyed a full head of luxuriant hair because they ate yogurt. In fact, lactobacillus bulgaricus was named after them.

This time I was fortunate to get Columbo whole milk yogurt. Much more pleasant to eat, it was a rich, comforting experience. Immediately my hair decided to hold on to the scalp.

Ever since that time, I’ve been a grateful eater of yogurt. And, even though it is a different color now, I still have hair on my head.


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